OUTLIERS – Part 2

2. The 10,000 – Hour Rule

“IN HAMBURG, WE HAD TO PLAY FOR EIGHT HOURS”

Bill Joy – University of Michigan – Year of Computer Center opened. He was sixteen. In his freshman year, he stumbled across the Computer Center – and he was hooked. From that point on, CC was his life. He programmed whenever he could.  He buried himself even deeper in the world of computer software. During the oral exams for his PhD, he made up a particularly complicated algorithm on the fly.

And you know who wrote much of the software that allows you to access the Internet.

Its the story of how the outliers in a particular field reached their lofty status through a combination of ability, opportunity, and utterly arbitrary advantage.

Is there such a thing as innate talent? Yes. Not every hockey player born in Jan ends up playing at the professional level. Only some do – the innately talented ones. Achievement is talent plus preparation.

The people at the very top don’t work just harder or even much harder than everyone else. They work much, much harder.

Researchers have settled on what they believe is the magic number for true expertise: Ten thousand hours.

Other interesting thing about that ten thousand hours, is an enormous time. It’s all impossible to reach that number all by yourself by the time you’re young adult. You have to have parents who encourage and support you. You can’t be poor, to hold part-time job to help make ends meet. Most people get into some kind of special program.

Is the ten thousand hour rule a general rule of success? – Opportunity

Beatles – Hamburg, Germany

Bill Gates – School, Computer club- Cclub money – ISI – walk to college

List of billionaires – born year and field matters.

Born 1955 – All software giants (Bill gates, Eric, Paul Allen, Steve Ballmer)


 

3. The Trouble with Geniuses – 1

“KNOWLEDGE OF A BOY’S IQ IS OF LITTLE HELP IF YOU ARE FACED WITH A FORMFUL OF CLEVER BOYS”

Super IQ – Genius – extraordinary work, memory power, multi talent

Termites – Terman IQ research children with high IQ irrespective of family background.

Geniuses are ultimate outliers. Is it true?

Terman made an error about termites success.

Intelligence IQ has a threshold, we think nobel prize winners in science must have highest IQ. Its not, to be Nobel Prize winner, you have to be smart enough to get into a college as good, Thats all.

“Intellect and achievement are far from perfectly correlated”

It little help if you faced with a classroom of clever boys – Surrounding matters.


4. The Trouble with Geniuses – 2

“AFTER PROTRACTED NEGOTIATIONS, IT WAS AGREED THAT ROBERT WOULD BE PUT ON PROBATION”

Practical Intelligence – Where highest IQ people won’t think practical.

“It knowing what to say to whom, knowing when to say it, and knowing how to say it for maximum effect”.

Langan don’t want to work in Harvard (he thinks college wont allow you to explore your ideas, it work like corporation, where we work for investors/owners). Robert don’t like physics and tried to kill his tutor.

Analytical intelligence and practical intelligence are “orthogonal”.

Analytical intelligence at least a part comes from your genes.

Practical or social savvy is knowledge. Its the skill have to be learned and come from somewhere, the place seem to get these kinds of attitudes and skills from our families.

Upper-class parent shuttling children from activities. They teach them to be open, talk or ask question irrespective of  any designation or stranger.

Middle-class – they command and expect to talk back or negotiate.

Lower-class – didn’t get any kind of this, Their responsibility to care their children, but to let them grow and develop on their own.

Entitlement – attitude perfectly suited to succeeding in the modern world.

Termites to groups A,B,C.

A – 90% graduates with more degrees.

B – doing “satisfactorily”

C – bottom, were postal workers, struggling book keepers and ideal at home, college dropouts.

Resulted show their community background also same.

What did Cs lack. Not IQ, they lacked something that could have been given to them if we’d only known they needed it: a community around them that prepared them properly for the world. They were squandered talent. But they didn’t need to be.

Langan lives in rural horse farm, work lonely what he likes to do. Every experience he had outside ended in frustration. He knew he needed to do a better job navigation the world, but he didn’t know how. He couldn’t even talk to his teacher, for goodness’ sake. These were others, with lesser minds, could master easily.

It wasn’t excuse. It was a fact, he had to make his way alone, and no one – not rock star, athletes, software billionaires and not even geniuses – ever makes it alone.

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